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Posts Tagged ‘Diana Poulsen’

 

How Hayao Miyazaki Opened my Mind, Sailor Moon and David Bowie made me a Digital Artist, and Why I explain images to people.

This is the last lecture I gave after 7 1/2 years as a contract professor at Fanshawe college.*

“I learned HTML to share Sailor Moon with the world.”

I talk about the intersections of pop culture, videogames, and art and how all of that influenced the way I taught art history and make art work. How the past may be very distant, but manages to touch everything we do.
Thank you to Ainsley Arnold for recording video I spliced into the slides. Thank you to Dames Making Games and friends for encouraging me to post my lecture.

And of course, thanks again Fine Art! It was blast teaching art history and seeing all the work each of you created during your education.

*I left teaching not because of a lack of passion, but because I can’t live off the $8000 I make teaching four classes a year. (yes, eight thousand dollars a year, you didn’t misread and I didn’t mistype.)

 

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I hoped to get something  published before I went under for surgery. I’m glad it did. 

A new article of mine is up at Kill Screen.

This time I compare open word games, in particular Skyrim, to Borges’ short story the Library of Babel.

 

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Limbo
Joshua Barndt
Jan 8th – Feb 6th 2010
XPACE Cultural Centre
Xbase

Joshua Barndt - Limbo - 2010 (Installation shot from Barndt's website)

As I boldly stepped into the basement of XPACE I entered another world or environment created by Joshua Barndt. A new world at the end of the world, the limbo after an Apocalypse. Remnants of old cars buried in mounds soil, revealing convenient tiered spaces for wild gardens. Amongst these remains, Barndt planted wheat grass which grew in perfectly straight lines; seeming synthetic in their stiffness, but organic in actuality.  I witnessed one viewer who was unsure of the nature of the grass then, I gasped,  he pulled some of the grass out of the installation to further examine whether or not it was plastic or organic. Conversely, I asked a gallery attendant, though I did kneel and examined, with my eye, the grass trying to guess whether it was plastic or biological. Despite the viewer’s destruction, I should applaud Barndt for creating such a thoroughly illusionistic installation causing a viewer to have to pull apart the work to be convinced of its organic nature.*

Lights in the installation were strategically placed to provided limited illumination as well as energy for the grass to grow. The wheat grass was freshly planted, since I could still see the soil surrounding the individual blades of grass. I admittedly went and saw Limbo the first day it opened, which has constantly made me think back to exhibition and how it must look now. Did the grass survive? It is more lush? How does it smell now? Has the discarded trash vanished in a sea of green? I am imagining it growing (bad pun) and changing while I am away from it. I am always curious about how it will look from one day to the next and that is why I enjoyed this installation. Limbo is different every time a viewer visits it. Limbo is a rare installation that I wanted and encouraged others to visit more than once.

* As a general courtesy, one should never touch or move a work of art without the expressed permission of the Artist.  Not touching, while difficult, will save you and the Artist the anguish of damaging a work of art. If you are unsure whether it is appropriate to touch the work, ask the gallery attendant first.

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